The Dangers of Conversion Therapy

Conversion therapy is a barbaric practice based in pseudo-science and religious zealotry. As of August 8th, 2014, it is only banned in two states – New Jersey and California. On December 2nd, Washington DC banned it’s use in minors. Nationwide, bans have been introduced in Michigan, voted down in Virginia and Illinois, and stalled in ten other states.

Survivors of this insane (and it is insane in the cruelest of ways) abusive, and completely ineffective “treatment” often endure more psychological damage from their “reparative therapy” than any one human should ever go through.

“Pray The Gay Away” camps are still rampant in the middle and southern regions of the United States. These church-run camps are where ignorant parents send their gay offspring, should that child come out of the closet.

The Dangers of Conversion Therapy

The book Youth in Crisis by Mitchell Gold speaks to the damaging effects of the stifling, stunted, and backwards belief systems associated with “Praying the gay away”:

Rather than resolving conflicts, reparative therapy programs create new ones by falsely promising gay people who are unhappy with their sexual orientation that they can become heterosexual. When gay men and women find that they can’t change, they end up with feelings of guilt and failure that lead to depression, loss of friends and social support, addictive behaviors, and substance abuse.

The methodology used by the therapists conducting conversion therapy in order to “cure” their patients ranges from estrogen for males (to quell their libido), to electroconvulsive therapy. The theory behind the latter treatment (and it is painful to use “treatment” and not “torture”) is that the seizure will somehow rearrange the “faulty” wiring in the subject’s mind, and somehow trigger heterosexuality.

Great numbers of the LGBTQ community have suffered the immense traumas that come with being an openly gay child or teen in conservative America, often repeatedly, and with tragic results. The toxic and completely detrimental practice of conversion therapy is a singular American experience.

When an individual is told that an essential part of them is wrong and terrible, that their god hates them for what they can’t help, that they are going to hell for being their natural self, the end results are often tragic. The American Psychiatric Association states:

The potential risks of reparative therapy are great, including depression, anxiety and self-destructive behavior, since therapist alignment with societal prejudices against homosexuality may reinforce self-hatred already experienced by the patient. Many patients who have undergone reparative therapy relate that they were inaccurately told that homosexuals are lonely, unhappy individuals who never achieve acceptance or satisfaction. The possibility that the person might achieve happiness and satisfying interpersonal relationships as a gay man or lesbian is not presented, nor are alternative approaches to dealing with the effects of societal stigmatization discussed.

The LGBTQ community in the United States must work towards a national ban on this outmoded, and, frankly, cruel practice that has been built on a foundation of bigotry and lies. Parents should not be able to send their children away to be “fixed” or create an impossible transformation in a perfectly healthy human being.

LGBTQ Parenting: Recognizing Rights

The generation that followed the baby boom is reaching parenting age. Simultaneously, the sexual revolution is coming full circle. More LGBTQ people within that particular age bracket are being recognized with equal rights under state and local laws.

With the question of the equal right to marry tabled in many states, the question regarding what is, traditionally, the next step in a relationship comes into play — the question of children. Overwhelmingly, the most common question newly married heterosexual couples are asked once their honeymoon period is over tends to be about children, and when they’re going to fit them into their timeline.

In twelve states, it remains illegal for LGBTQ couples to adopt children. Equally frustrating, it remains illegal for the non-biological partner to become a legal parent by way of adoption in those states, as well as several others. While those twelve states strictly ban same-sex adoptions, the remaining states, by and large, have adoption policies for LGBTQ couples that come with caveats for petitions that straight couples do not have to process.

LGBTQ Parenting: Recognizing Rights

This bureaucratic obstacle course is flat discrimination. Heterosexual and homosexual couples share the same human qualities: love, aspirations, plans for the future, shared finances; that’s all a given in any healthy relationship.

Biologically speaking, the complex issue of children tends to be where the two respective camps split. The paths divide at this point. Heterosexual couples must make an effort, for most of the span of their relationships, to actively avoid pregnancy, while LGBTQ couples must make a concerted effort to pursue having children, by way of either IVF or adoption. IVF therapies for lesbian couples are expensive, time-consuming, and often a strain on the health of the partner who would be carrying the child. Hormone therapy is often a necessary precursor to conception.

And yet, the LGBTQ community is reproducing in greater numbers than ever before. With an atmosphere of greater social acceptance and a wider array of options, an entire generation of LGBTQ parents is on the rise, recognized or not.

Healthcare Reform: The Benefits and Drawbacks for Transgender Persons

As we enter the second annual application window for the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more commonly known as “Obamacare,” it’s worth discussing the needs of members of the LGBT community and how have they been aided or not aided as the case may be overall by the role out of ACA.

Before we begin it’s important to acknowledge that there was by and large nowhere to go but up for transgender persons in healthcare, both on gender specific and general care. The obvious and most extensively discussed benefit is the ban on discrimination, which includes sexual and gender identity built in to the ACA.

“The question is, what is gender identity nondiscrimination?” said Kellan Baker, associate director of the LGBT Research and Communications Project at the Center for American Progress. “Does it mean you can’t hang up the phone on a trans person? Does it mean that you can’t cover their cervical cancer treatments unless [a policyholder is] listed female? Does it mean that transition care has to be covered?”

Healthcare Reform: The Benefits and Drawbacks for Transgender PersonsThese choices unfortunately have thus far been left up to the states. In making seriously life decisions it is important to familiarize yourself with your individual state’s protections for gender identity. A mere six states have formerly stated intent to interpret the gender-identity nondiscrimination provision to mean coverage of transition-related care. Those states are California, Colorado, Oregon, Vermont and Connecticut.

The concern, beyond the coverage of transitional care is the bigger issue of treatment of a person who’s presented or physical gender does not match the selected gender on the policy holder’s form. Why does this have anything to do with the ACA? It’s alarmingly simple. Through the ACA, in general, single persons making under 400% of the federal poverty line, qualify for credits towards insurance. However the gender selection on the application must match the gender selected on the applicant’s social security card. Which enters you in to a gigantic catch 22: if these do not match you can be denied treatment, but if you have not fully transitioned you can be denied gender specific treatments in most states.

“It’s happening a lot more now because so many more people have insurance,” says Dr. Robert Winn, medical director of Mazzoni Center in Philadelphia, the city’s only community health center focused on the needs of the LGBT population. “Now, a trans man will come in and get their annual gym[ecological] exam, but it might get rejected because they’ll say, ‘This is a male and this diagnosis and the procedure code is female, so were not going to pay for it,’” he said.

Beyond being in detailed communication with your doctor, Transequality.org is coordinating filing of complaints and other instances of conflicts and discrimination of services. Ultimately it is easier than ever as a transgender person to receive health coverage, but still presents challenges it is important to be aware of going in to any healthcare situation, and be your own advocate.

President Obama Wants Conversion Therapy Banned

Transgender 17-year-old Leelah Alcorn wrote in her suicide note that one of the ways her family rejected her was by forcing her to see “Christian therapists.”  These therapists told her that she was selfish and wrong, and should look to God for help. Soon after her suicide, a White House petition was started, calling for “Leelah’s Law,”  which would ban all forms of the cruel ex-transgender and ex-gay conversion therapies.

Recently, the White House responded to the petition in agreement that conversion therapy should be banned.  Valerie Jarrett, White House Senior Advisor, said, “The overwhelming scientific evidence demonstrates that conversion therapy, especially when it is practiced on young people, is neither medically nor ethically appropriate and can cause substantial harm.”  She added, “As part of our dedication to protecting America’s youth, this Administration supports efforts to ban the use of conversion therapy for minors.”

President Obama Wants Conversion Therapy Banned

Jarrett believes that even with the best intentions, families can cause harm to their children who are LGBTQ. She said, “Countless families and guardians across the country proudly support their LGBTQ+ children. Too many LGBTQ+ youth, however, lack this support system, which can have devastating consequences. Negative family reactions to LGBTQ+ youth can be perceived as rejection by children, often contributing to serious health issues and inhibiting a child’s development and well-being. And when it comes to LGBTQ+ youth, some actions by family and caregivers can be harmful, despite even the best intentions.”

This year, Republican lawmakers have defeated several legislative bans that were pending in various states; some are still pending. Currently, only California, New Jersey, and Washington, DC have banned conversion therapy for minors. According to Jarrett, a national ban would require congressional action. But, she said: “We’re hopeful that the clarity of the evidence combined with the action taken by the states will lead to broader action that the administration would support.”

Jarrett stated in an interview with the New York Times that Obama was incredibly moved by Alcorn’s story and added that it’s not a unique experience: “It’s not the story of one young person,” she said. “It is the story of countless young people who have been subjected to this.”

5 Ways Bisexual Women Can Pursue Better Healthcare

Many individuals in the LGBT community face significant issues with regard to health care. For example, bisexual women face a high risk of physical and mental health problems and have a higher likelihood of experiencing violence and addiction. Discrimination is often experienced within the healthcare system. The bisexual community is fighting this, to spread education and make quality healthcare more accessible.

There are some general guidelines that may be helpful for bisexual women who are looking for quality health care. Read on to learn the five ways bisexual women can take care of their health, even while facing exceptional challenges.

5 Ways Bisexual Women Can Pursue Better Healthcare

Be aware of risks
Bisexual women are more likely to experience addiction, smoke, have depression and have suicidal thoughts and/or attempts, compared to other groups. Bi woman are also at a higher risk for cancer than heterosexual women or lesbians and less likely to get screening. Amy André, a co-author of Bisexual Health: An Introduction said, “Research shows that bisexuals experience more discrimination, violence, and stigma than gays and lesbians.” She believes that the fact that bisexuals have the worst health is directly linked to the violence, stigma and discrimination.

Seek quality health care
Unfortunately, it’s not possible to assume that every doctor is able to cater to the unique needs of LGBT patients. It is easier in urban areas, but still more difficult to find a provider that doesn’t group bisexual patients with gay or straight women. There is a list of providers in the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association directory and the Bisexual-Aware Professionals Directory. Everyone deserves to be treated with respect and compassion.

Be your own advocate
You’ll need to be more assertive at times because some doctors will ask questions that are heteronormative. If you find that the doctor assumes you are a sexuality that you aren’t, you may need to answer broadly. You’ll want to make sure that you’re giving proper information about your past and current partners, and your sexuality. Some women will find it more difficult if they live in a small community with few doctors. Push yourself as far as you feel comfortable and remember that you can request certain types of screening for your physical and mental health.

Know your financial barriers
According to LGBT MAP’s Unfair Price study, bi women are more than twice as likely to live in poverty than the general population, and 29% of LGBT women have trouble finding affordable health care, compared to 19% of heterosexual women. Women in rural areas may experience even more difficulty. It’s of vital importance to have access to affordable health care. This could mean a visit to a free clinic, Planned Parenthood or a doctor’s office that takes your health insurance.

Get the word out
Form a support system and be supportive to others in a similar position. Doing this not only positively affects your chances of receiving affordable health care, it improves your health.

Many Transgender People are Completely Avoiding Doctors

It can be difficult for many individuals to have discussions about their sexual history with a physician. It’s not uncommon for people to consider it uncomfortable. But, for many transgender people, the conversation never happens because they do not seek out health care, according to Adrian Juarez, PhD, a public health nurse and assistant professor in the University at Buffalo School of Nursing.

A preliminary study (“Examining the Role of Social Networks on Venue-Based HIV Testing Access and Decision Making in an Urban, Transgendered Population”) that examined health-based decision making and access to HIV testing in urban, transgender populations, showed that many transgender individuals withheld from pursuing necessary care due to social stigma and lack of affordability.

Many Transgender People are Completely Avoiding Doctors

“There is evidence that health care providers do tend to be judgmental, and it’s unwelcoming,” says Juarez.  Of course, people are not going to visit health care providers if they fear that they’re going to face discrimination and stigma.

The results of the study are especially cause for concern because, according to a 2009 report from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), about one third of transgender people in the U.S. are HIV positive. And, transgender women of color are even more at risk of HIV infection. According to the NIH study, more than 56 percent of black transgender women are HIV positive.

Among other reasons, an inability to afford medical care is keeping transgender patients away from doctors. Transgender people are more than twice as likely to be homeless and four times more likely to experience extreme poverty (compared to the general population)…having a household income of less than $10,000 per year. This data comes from a 2011 report from the National Center for Transgender Equality. It’s not as if it’s easy for transgender people to get work, either. According to the National Center for Transgender Equality, out of more than 6,000 transgender people surveyed in the nation, 90 percent said they were subject to mistreatment, harassment, and discrimination at work.

If a transgender person does happen to visit a healthcare provider, some doctors are not informed on how to properly treat the  patients. Juarez says, “It puzzles me how doctors will still refer to trans individuals by their biological name. That’s their identity.”

The line between identifying and biological gender can be blurry in healthcare settings. For example, transgender men still need Pap smears and transgender women need prostate screenings, but some health care providers might not offer these tests in order to keep from making suggestions that go against the patient’s identified gender. There is an urgent need to address stigmatization and provide health care professionals education on how to appropriately and compassionately treat transgender patients.

New Jersey Schools Still No Stranger to Gay Hate

Now, with social media, it is easier than ever to discover the views and routines of the people that we work with through websites like Facebook where one can “like” a post and have it show up in the newsfeeds of friends and even friends of friends. Of course the downside of this is that private opinion can quickly become public. Such was the case when Reverend Warren Hall, one of the directors at Seton Hall University in New Jersey “liked” a gay equality “No H8” photo on facebook.

Reverend Warren Hall claims that the facebook post cost him his job. Seton Hall University declines to comment on the incident, but the Reverend states that the incident is reason to address the issue of LGBT rights more frequently among religious organizations. The anti-gay Facebook comments that were allegedly made by a High School teacher earlier this year leads one to wonder if the New Jersey School system needs to address LGBT issues more frequently. New Jersey Human Rights laws do prohibit bullying and discrimination in schools, but the failure of the state to fire teachers such as Knox that make anti-gay remarks in the name of free speech smacks of an ineptitude for truly resolving LGBT rights issues.

New Jersey Schools Still No Stranger to Gay Hate

The real issue here is not just one of privacy and discrimination. The mood of a nation is being threatened by a stigma, and it’s this same stigma that prevents LGBT youths and young adults from seeking the health counseling that they need. The failure of the education system to address LGBT sexual health and relationships is perhaps the biggest obstacle in the fight against the spread of STDs, so it is important that people in communities where injustices like this occur raise their voices.

If you are interested in becoming more involved in your community’s awareness of LGBT issues the website http://www.lgbtcenters.org/ has local directories.

Important Ways Parents Contribute to LGBT Teens Health

Many parents of teenagers have their hands full, to put it lightly. Being a parent is not an easy job. You have to work on your own issues and those of your children. LGBT teens have particular health issues that need to be addressed and many heterosexual parents are either not aware of them or they don’t know where to start when it comes to helping their teens be healthy. Here are some steps you can take to help your teenager:

Seek out a pediatrician who is LGBT-friendly
This is important because your child might not be comfortable with the doctor they had in childhood. You may find a healthcare provider that’s LGBT or who is an ally. In order to find out, you must ask them. It’s also possible that they will be listed online. The Gay and Lesbian Medical Association (GLMA) has a database that is searchable by zip code.

Look into mental health care
Even if your teenager doesn’t appear to have signs of mental distress, they might. They might need someone with whom they can speak and feel comfortable saying things that they may not with a parent. Check out GLMA’s website for this information if you want. Also, consider someone to talk with for your own needs.

Remember that safe sex is still important
If your teen is with a same-sex partner, they still need to learn about safe sex practices. Make sure they’re tested for HIV and STIs and follow up with testing regularly. Make sure they know how to protect themselves in many ways, including not allowing themselves to be pressured into having sex before they’re ready.

Important Ways Parents Contribute to LGBT Teens Health

Vaccinations are important
Health care providers are not recommending that the HPV vaccine Gardasil is given to girls and boys. It’s important to get them vaccinated. For example, health care providers recommend that men who have sex with men (MSM) are given vaccinations against Hepatitis A & B, HPV, and the flu (annually) to begin with.

Keep watch of their online personas
This is important for everyone, whether or not they have LGBT kids. Your children are vulnerable to being lured into unsafe experiences or relationships by predatory adults. Make sure to pay attention to their online activity and have talks with them about how they appear in their online world. A harsh and constant reality is that bullying and violence against LGBT people exists; this includes child abuse and exploitation.

Speak about substance use/abuse
LGBT people are at a higher risk for substance abuse. Talk with your kids about the risks and the pressures they might face. If your child has a problem, seek treatment.

Love them unconditionally
Good health depends a great deal on a child’s supportive, loving environment.

Mental Health’s Influence on HIV Prevention

The HIV epidemic has changed a lot within the past 20 years, and still yet, continued high risk behaviors have remained the same.  Contributing factors to these behaviors include a lack of power or oppression, marginalization, sexual abuse, sexual compulsivity, low self esteem, depression, and loneliness.  These are not issues that can be fixed quickly.  Addressing these issues requires effort and time and may extend beyond the capabilities of many HIV programs for prevention.

An important thing learned from HIV prevention research is one size doesn’t fit all. Programs require different components that address the various different needs of clients.  Increased access to syringes for people who inject drugs, and condoms to those who have sex are necessary to win the battle against HIV.  Skill building and increasing knowledge about HIV are good methods for prevention, but they don’t work for everyone.  For most, the obstacles related to behavior changes involves dealing with mental health problems.

What people experience and what they do have effects on their mental health. Substance abuse and use (even when the drugs are not abused), marginalization, poverty, and discrimination are all serious factors that can have a big impact on one’s mental health and can place some people at a higher risk for contracting an HIV infection.

Mental Health's Influence on HIV Prevention

Do Issues with Mental Health Affect HIV Risk?

Yes. When someone decides to engage in a risky drug or sexual act, it doesn’t always occur due a consciously made decision.  Instead, these decisions are sometimes based on an attempt to get satisfaction for another need related to a mental health condition. For example:

  • Low self-esteem: For many men who have sex with other men (MSM), internalized homophobia and low self-esteem can impact their risk of of contracting HIV.  Internalized homophobia is a feeling which results in a person having a lack of self-acceptance, feeling unhappy, or self-condemnation for being gay.  In one study, it showed that men who did test positive for HIV were the ones that were in fact the ones that experienced internalized homophobia.  These men seemed to spend less time with others who lived the same lifestyle, and they also showed less satisfaction in their relationships.
  • Male to female transgender persons, also known as MTFs, identify depression, rejection, feelings of isolation, and low self esteem as barriers to risk of HIV reduction.  Many MTFs state that they take part in unprotected sex because it verifies their identity and helps boost their self esteem.
  • Post traumatic stress disorder:  People who are diagnosed with PTSD seem to partake in high-risk sexual behaviors.  One study showed that 59% of the women who were HIV positive had full PTSD due to traumas, such as rape, assault, or witnessing a murder. Non-violent traumas including serious accidents, loss or children, or homelessness.  Still yet, these women were not being treated for PTSD.  A national study performed on veterans found that substance abusers who had PTSD were more than 12 times as likely to be HIV infected than those veterans who were not suffering from PTSD or substance abuse.
  • Depression and anxiety: Those suffering from depression and anxiety are more likely to take part in high- risk sexual activities, such as substance abuse, including injection drug use, prostitution and choosing a high-risk partner.  A study following city youths for over a several year time period found that the change in risk behaviors wasn’t associated with access to information, counseling or knowing someone had AIDS.

What can be done?

As you can clearly see, mental health conditions by far increase risky sexual behaviors.  In order to address mental health issues, it is important that a person visit an individual therapist or counselor, as well as a physician to be put on appropriate medication(s). It’s also important for such people to have access to structural and community level programs that address mental health needs and HIV.

Individuals with HIV Age 14 Years Faster, According to Study

A diagnosis of HIV is no longer the death sentence it used to be; we’ve come a long way. However, there is a new study that was published in PLOS One that shows that although HIV positive individuals are typically living longer, they may be aging more quickly than expected. The study shows that those with HIV are at a greater risk of age-related diseases including kidney disease, frailty, osteoporosis, neurocognitive disease and some cancers.

Researchers are not pointing to the medications used to treat HIV as being the reason for faster aging; they think it’s HIV itself and that it speeds the process by 14 years.  Scientists from the Multi-Center AIDS Cohort Study and the UCLA AIDS Institute and Center for AIDS Research looked at whether HIV induced epigenetic changes that are age-related, meaning those changes to the DNA that do not change the genetic code, lead to changes in expression of genes. These types of transitions are triggered by the aging process itself or environmental factors.

Individuals with HIV Age 14 Years Faster, According to Study

One of the study’s senior authors, Beth Jamieson, professor of medicine in the division of hematology/oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, director of the UCLA Flow Cytometry Core said, “While we were surprised by the number of epigenetic changes that were significantly associated with both aging and HIV-infection, we were most surprised that the data suggests HIV-infection can accelerate aging-related epigenetic changes by 13.7 to 14.7 years.”  There is published data and anecdotal evidence that lines up with this number. It suggests that treated HIV positive adults may develop age-related diseases, about a decade sooner than those who are uninfected.

The study looked at 96 samples of white blood cells from both young and old HIV patients before they began Antiretroviral Therapy (ART). DNA was then extracted and looked at for changes. When studied, there was a lot of overlap when the pattern of changes was compared to the pattern connected with aging. After extrapolating the biological ages of the HIV positive patients, researchers found that the patients were 14 years older than their actual age on both a cellular and physiological level.

Researchers say that this data suggests that HIV speeds up some aspects of the aging process, and there are common mechanisms found in both HIV-related aging and general aging. They consider the results of the study to be an important start in the attempt to find therapeutic approaches to mitigate the effects of HIV and aging.

Gay Men “Serosort” to Prevent Contracting HIV

One study in Seattle showed that approximately 40 % of men who are HIV negative make sure to only have sex with others who share their serostatus in order to attempt to prevent contracting the virus. A similar German study found that 10 percent of HIV positive gay men believe they are noninfectious if they have a viral load that is undetectable. Both studies’s results were presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Boston.

In Seattle, two different questionnaires that included 1902 gay men accessing an HIV/ STI clinic between February and August of 2013,  were conducted by researchers.  The first one asked questions about their recent sexual behavior.  For example, the HIV status of their partners, what role they played during sex, whether they use condoms, and other topics were brought up. The second questionnaire asked about what they did to reduce their risk of HIV.

Both questionnaires were completed by a total of 964 people, including 835 (87%) who were HIV negative and 129 (13%) who were HIV positive. Forty-two percent of HIV negative men were strict serosorters; they reported to only have sex with other HIV negative men (with or without a condom). Thirty-nine percent of these men said this was a deliberate strategy. A total of 6.5% practiced condom serosorting, which means they only  reported  having sex without a condom with other HIV negative men. 5.2% said this was deliberate. Lastly, 7.1 % were seropositioning, which means they only had condomless sex if they were the top, no matter their partner’s HIV status; 6.5% said this was a strategy.

Gay Men "Serosort" to Prevent Contracting HIV

Thirty-two percent of HIV positive men were strict serosorters, 25% of them doing this deliberately. Eleven percent engaged in condom serosorting and 10% in seropositioning.

In the German study presented at CROI, researchers asked 269 gay men who were HIV positive about whether they thought they could infect somebody if they had a viral load that was undetectable.  Ten percent of this group thought they were noninfectious, with a fully suppressed virus and they held this belief when making choices about sex.  Of these viral sorters, 57.5 %  reported condomless sex,  compared with 36% of men who were not viral sorters. Nineteen percent of the viral sorters said that recently they told someone about their status, while 22 % had not discussed HIV recently at all.  On these two counts, the respective figures for the rest of the men were 42% and 44%.

A Dating App for Lesbians Created by a Lesbian

The dating app called “Her” was created exclusively for lesbians.

The service used to be named “Dattch” (a combo of the words date and catch), but people were having trouble pronouncing it, remembering it or knowing what it meant. In addition, Dattch was made for romantic relationships and dating. Her, on the other hand, has the option for pursuing relationships that are strictly platonic. This occurred because a lot of people wanted to be in on the social side of Her–the events posted and what everyone’s up to, for example. Her is a place to find a community of lesbians.

A Dating App for Lesbians Created by a Lesbian

Even though people of any sexual orientation are able to use OkCupid, Match.com, and Tinder, Her was the first dating app created for lesbians. The other sites usually have a limited dating pool for lesbians, with men even pretending to be women sometimes. There is another popular app that was created for lesbians. It’s called Brenda and was created by a man. Some people would not consider that encouraging or appealing.

When users of Her visit the site they are shown one profile at a time. This gives them the option to “like” the profile. Both users can exchange private messages if they “like” each other. Users are encouraged to upload photos of themselves to be displayed. There’s a lot going on with Her as far as social events go, too. There are blog feeds on the app, for eight cities across the US that show what’s going on in entertainment.

There have been some obstacles along with the creation of Her. Exton said that she had issues trying to find investors, some even doubting her sexuality because she has long hair. She was also told there wasn’t any market, but thankfully this has proven to be false because the app has seen consistent, month-to-month growth.

6 Major Reasons We Need to Rethink HIV Prevention

Many HIV prevention campaigns rely on appealing to our emotions, but are not taking a good look at the HIV research and information available. Read on to see why we should rethink HIV prevention.

60 Percent of young people with HIV do not know their status
According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 60 percent of young individuals have no idea that they have HIV. Some men and women who are HIV negative think that it is too big of a risk to be with someone who discloses that they are HIV positive, yet they might go on to have sex with someone who believes they’re HIV negative, but hasn’t been tested to verify. Those undiagnosed carry a higher viral load than those who are aware of their status and on treatment.

91 percent of new HIV transmission happen by those who are not diagnosed or haven’t been treated
This statistic comes from a new study released by JAMA Internal Medicine. In 2009, there were more than 1.1 million people living with HIV; of these people 207,600 were undiagnosed and 519,414 knew they were HIV positive, but were not receiving medical care. In comparison to those who were undiagnosed, those who knew about their status, yet not receiving medical care were 19 percent less likely to transmit the virus.

6 Major Reasons We Need to Rethink HIV Prevention

Those who are HIV positive and receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) who have achieved an undetectable viral load are 96 percent less likely to spread HIV
There hasn’t been a reported case of anyone living with the virus with an undetectable viral load who has transmitted the virus.

Truvada has been shown to reduce HIV transmission by 96 – 99 percent, when used daily
One new study also shows when PrEP is used as needed (a user taking Truvada 2-24 hours before sex and one pill 24 and 48 hours after) has shown to be 86 percent effective in preventing HIV. With all that’s available–TasP, PrEP and condom use, there seems to be much less of a reason to fear sex with someone with someone of opposite HIV status. Be open and honest with your partner.

Three out of 10 in the US have their virus under control
The care continuum, which is also known as the HIV treatment cascade, showed that even though 86 percent of people living with HIV were diagnosed, only 30 percent of them had  an undetectable viral load. The majority of those living with HIV know they have it, but are either too scared or unable to do what is needed to control it.

You can expect to live an additional 51 years if you’re newly diagnosed in your 20’s
That is, if you enter proper treatment. This is roughly the same number of years as a person without HIV would live. Many need only take one pill each day to manage HIV. Of course, there are mental and emotional health issues to treat as well.